A poll in Bucha within the Atom for Peace Street Action. Do you think Ukraine should try to defend its rights under the Budapest memorandum?

To check the citizens’ awareness on nuclear and radiation safety, a poll was conducted by the Uatom.org Editorial Board in Bucha within the Atom for Peace street action. The event took place on 6 August 2018 in the central square of the town. Thanks to all of you who agreed to frankly answer our questions.

Tetiana, 67, physics engineer

1. On 5 December 1994, U.S. President Bill Clinton, British Prime Minister John Major and Russian President Boris Yeltsin signed the Budapest Memorandum with the first Ukrainian President Leonid Kravchuk. In response to the adoption of a nuclear-free status, the leaders of three nuclear states promised to provide Ukraine with adequate international security guarantees. Taking into account the today’s realities, do you think Ukraine should try to defend its rights under the Budapest Memorandum and if so, then in what way?

“Now there is a redivision of the world. This concerns not only Ukraine. Increased population of the Earth, lack of food. People strive for comfort, but in the pursuit of it, we will reach the limit when this comfort is so significant that will destroy us. So in these circumstances, we should not have given up nuclear weapons”.

2. What is your reading of “responsible attitude to nuclear energy”?

“Frankly speaking, I am a supporter of developing renewable energy in Ukraine. However, it is solar and wind energy, not hydro. The latter contributes to the destruction of rivers. In my opinion, in the near future, Ukraine should completely give up nuclear energy, replacing it with a renewable one”.

Interviewee speech style remains unchanged in the publication.

Oleg, 34, cook

1. On 5 December 1994, U.S. President Bill Clinton, British Prime Minister John Major and Russian President Boris Yeltsin signed the Budapest Memorandum with the first Ukrainian President Leonid Kravchuk. In response to the adoption of a nuclear-free status, the leaders of three nuclear states promised to provide Ukraine with adequate international security guarantees. Taking into account the today’s realities, do you think Ukraine should try to defend its rights under the Budapest Memorandum and if so, then in what way?

“As for me, there is no sense already to do anything. Ukraine should not have given up nuclear weapons. It is virtually impossible to return nuclear potential today. After all, where to get money for new nuclear weapons? From pockets of officials or still from pockets of ordinary citizens? Moreover, I am far from being sure that the guarantor states will help Ukraine somehow in the today’s realities”.

2. What is your reading of “responsible attitude to nuclear energy”?

“Nuclear energy should be as protected as possible. This should be provided by authorities, because NPPs are property of the state. At the same time, the authorities should do all possible to ensure continuous upgrade of equipment at NPPs, to monitor the number of operational events, etc”.

Interviewee speech style remains unchanged in the publication.

Yanina, 43, Sales Director, Regional Manager

1. On 5 December 1994, U.S. President Bill Clinton, British Prime Minister John Major and Russian President Boris Yeltsin signed the Budapest Memorandum with the first Ukrainian President Leonid Kravchuk. In response to the adoption of a nuclear-free status, the leaders of three nuclear states promised to provide Ukraine with adequate international security guarantees. Taking into account the today’s realities, do you think Ukraine should try to defend its rights under the Budapest Memorandum and if so, then in what way?

“Of course, should. The Budapest Memorandum is an important document. However, as for me, an ordinary citizen is unlikely to be able to achieve something in this area. The issue should be solved at the state level, for example by leading lawyers, diplomats or officials”.

2. What is your reading of “responsible attitude to nuclear energy”?

“I think that there should be no nuclear plants in Ukraine. The same applies to the disposal of nuclear waste. Four operating NPPs in Ukraine were constructed in those times when opinion of the public on this issue was not interesting for anyone. However, today, I am sure that we should introduce some new, more up-to-date technologies, such as solar panels, wind towers. Europe is on this way, and I think we should also choose it”.

Interviewee speech style remains unchanged in the publication.

Yurii, 44, production worker

1. On 5 December 1994, U.S. President Bill Clinton, British Prime Minister John Major and Russian President Boris Yeltsin signed the Budapest Memorandum with the first Ukrainian President Leonid Kravchuk. In response to the adoption of a nuclear-free status, the leaders of three nuclear states promised to provide Ukraine with adequate international security guarantees. Taking into account the today’s realities, do you think Ukraine should try to defend its rights under the Budapest Memorandum and if so, then in what way?

“I believe Ukraine should continue defending its rights under the Budapest Memorandum. This, of course should be done at the highest state level. I think this is within the competence of the President of Ukraine”.

2. What is your reading of “responsible attitude to nuclear energy”?

“First, everyone should know that nuclear energy is not as scary as many people say. I think it is better to conduct an explanatory campaign for the public. I am a supporter of developing renewable energy in Ukraine, but now we use nuclear, so we should do all possible to make it safe”.

Interviewee speech style remains unchanged in the publication.

Nataliia, 63, retired

1. On 5 December 1994, U.S. President Bill Clinton, British Prime Minister John Major and Russian President Boris Yeltsin signed the Budapest Memorandum with the first Ukrainian President Leonid Kravchuk. In response to the adoption of a nuclear-free status, the leaders of three nuclear states promised to provide Ukraine with adequate international security guarantees. Taking into account the today’s realities, do you think Ukraine should try to defend its rights under the Budapest Memorandum and if so, then in what way?

“Of course, we should continue defending our rights! Nevertheless, unfortunately, it seems to me that these actions may be delayed. Please tell me have we ever thought that Russia would be our enemy? We always thought that they were our brothers; we have never expected cunning from them. As of today, I think that Ukraine should strive for activity on this issue from other signatories, namely, the United States and the United Kingdom. We cannot cope with this alone”.

2. What is your reading of “responsible attitude to nuclear energy”?

“My attitude to nuclear energy is ambiguous. If the state is responsible, it is well worth developing nuclear power, but if it is irresponsible, then, perhaps, it is better not to do this”.

Interviewee speech style remains unchanged in the publication.

Stanislav, 19, student

1. On 5 December 1994, U.S. President Bill Clinton, British Prime Minister John Major and Russian President Boris Yeltsin signed the Budapest Memorandum with the first Ukrainian President Leonid Kravchuk. In response to the adoption of a nuclear-free status, the leaders of three nuclear states promised to provide Ukraine with adequate international security guarantees. Taking into account the today’s realities, do you think Ukraine should try to defend its rights under the Budapest Memorandum and if so, then in what way?

“Frankly speaking, I am not interested in politics at all. However, I think that the state one way or another needs security. So, it’s necessary to reach peace by all means”.

2. What is your reading of “responsible attitude to nuclear energy”?

“I believe that the state should deal with the safety of nuclear facilities in Ukraine”.

Interviewee speech style remains unchanged in the publication.

Viktoriia, 30, book-keeper

1. On 5 December 1994, U.S. President Bill Clinton, British Prime Minister John Major and Russian President Boris Yeltsin signed the Budapest Memorandum with the first Ukrainian President Leonid Kravchuk. In response to the adoption of a nuclear-free status, the leaders of three nuclear states promised to provide Ukraine with adequate international security guarantees. Taking into account the today’s realities, do you think Ukraine should try to defend its rights under the Budapest Memorandum and if so, then in what way?

“I think signing of the Budapest Memorandum is the right decision. Nevertheless, now, we are unlikely to be able to demand something from the signatory states. They understand well that the provisions of the Budapest Memorandum are violated. Moreover, if they want to do something, they would do this long ago”.

2. What is your reading of “responsible attitude to nuclear energy”?

“I hope the government controls safe use of nuclear energy. After Chernobyl, everyone knows perfectly well how important it is. Nuclear energy is not a toy, so, I want to believe that we all are protected”.

Interviewee speech style remains unchanged in the publication.

Yurii, 32, worker

1. On 5 December 1994, U.S. President Bill Clinton, British Prime Minister John Major and Russian President Boris Yeltsin signed the Budapest Memorandum with the first Ukrainian President Leonid Kravchuk. In response to the adoption of a nuclear-free status, the leaders of three nuclear states promised to provide Ukraine with adequate international security guarantees. Taking into account the today’s realities, do you think Ukraine should try to defend its rights under the Budapest Memorandum and if so, then in what way?

“I think Ukraine should stand its ground. It would be good if the President, the Prime Minister, other officials go to various international events and help to resolve this issue”.

2. What is your reading of “responsible attitude to nuclear energy”?

“Nuclear energy is a bad thing at all. Power supply should be provided in a different way. What exactly I do not know. There are physicists, let them think”.

Interviewee speech style remains unchanged in the publication.

Iryna, 60, retired

1. On 5 December 1994, U.S. President Bill Clinton, British Prime Minister John Major and Russian President Boris Yeltsin signed the Budapest Memorandum with the first Ukrainian President Leonid Kravchuk. In response to the adoption of a nuclear-free status, the leaders of three nuclear states promised to provide Ukraine with adequate international security guarantees. Taking into account the today’s realities, do you think Ukraine should try to defend its rights under the Budapest Memorandum and if so, then in what way?

“In fact, all this is frightful. We have never thought that this could happen. We have never expected such actions from Russia. I have relatives living there and this situation for me personally is bad beyond belief. Should Ukraine defend its rights under the Budapest Memorandum? I think it should. However, it should demand the truth from the signatory states, and not to beg alms”.

2. What is your reading of “responsible attitude to nuclear energy”?

The Chernobyl disaster was terrible. Now, we should do all possible to avoid such misfortune in the future. For this purpose, the most stringent safety requirements should be applied at operating NPPs”.

Interviewee speech style remains unchanged in the publication.

Sviatoslav, 27, medical worker

1. On 5 December 1994, U.S. President Bill Clinton, British Prime Minister John Major and Russian President Boris Yeltsin signed the Budapest Memorandum with the first Ukrainian President Leonid Kravchuk. In response to the adoption of a nuclear-free status, the leaders of three nuclear states promised to provide Ukraine with adequate international security guarantees. Taking into account the today’s realities, do you think Ukraine should try to defend its rights under the Budapest Memorandum and if so, then in what way?

“Ukraine should require the guarantor states to defend it, but not the way Russia has already done. Who should apply to the Budapest memorandum signatories? I think, the President”.

2. What is your reading of “responsible attitude to nuclear energy”?

“It is better to replace nuclear energy by renewable one: hydroelectric power plants or solar power plants”.

Interviewee speech style remains unchanged in the publication.